Celtic Mythology, Heroes and Heroines

Learn more about the Elven World: Celtic Gods and Goddesses, Heroes and Heroines, Elven and Faery Elders, Elementals and Ascended Masters of the Tuatha dé Danann, Magical Beings of Ancient Irish Mythology and Legend

Here you will find a description of each of the characters in Elven World Adventure Series. They are the gods and goddesses of ancient Irish legend and Celtic mythology. They are the Tuatha dé Danann, which means tribe of the Goddess Danu. Danu is the mother of all peoples who came to Earth to live peacefully and respectfully within our planet’s bounty and beauty. Many people today consider these magical beings of ancient Irish mythology to be archetypes. Many others feel they are human representation of the Ascended Masters. Others still consider the Tuatha de Danann as a tribe of Lemurians, or a seed group from the Pleiades, who traveled from the Hill of Tara in Ireland through underground caverns to a new home in Mount Shasta. Legends speak of these magical people known around the world, who may have developed skills and abilities of a higher dimensional consciousness.

Digital Fine Artist, Indigo Ko, has developed the tarot cards for each of the characters of Elven World series as expressed in the Elven World adventure series of books, as you can see below. If you are interested in reading this tarot online go to the Elven World Community for more information. If you are interested in obtaining a copy of the illustrated books write to the author, Tara, at the Elven World Community on this site. This artwork is done by Indigo, for Elven World (c) 2018, for use only in Elven World adventure series books and materials. If you would like to obtain copies of this art, please contact Tara, author of the series on the elven community on this site.

Several of the digital paintings or renderings for each of the archetypes expressed by various artists. Where possible the artists and their websites have been found so you can obtain the artwork.

Angus

(AN-gus)

Tuatha dé Danann God of art and beauty in ancient Irish mythology. It has been said that his kisses turn to singing birds and that the music on his lyre draws all who hear it to his side.

Áine

(AN-ya)

Tuatha dé Danann Goddess of Love in ancient Irish mythology and legend. She is the daughter of Lugh and Mariam and the heroine of Elven World Book 2: Star Travelers, Through the Portal

Airmid

(AIR-mich)

Tuatha dé Danann Goddess of healing and medicine in ancient Irish mythology.

Balor

(BAL-er)

The one-eyed God of Death and king of the Fomorian in ancient Irish and Celtic mythology and legend.

BéChuille

(Bay KIL-a)

Tuatha dé Danann warrior princess as expressed in ancient Irish and Celtic mythology and legend.

Bran

(BRAHN)

An enchanted dog, or rather, an enchanted man in ancient Irish and Celtic mythology and legend.

Brigit

(BREET)

Tuatha dé Danann Goddess of fire in ancient Irish and Celtic mythology and legend.

Carman

(KAHR-mahn)

A Fomorian witch and Celtic goddess of evil magic in ancient Irish and legend. Her three sons, Dub (which means darkness in Gaelic), Dain (which means “violence”) and Dother (which means evil) fought heartlessly to destroy.

The Daghda

(DAHG-dah)

King of all things and father of all Tuatha dé Danann in ancient Irish mythology and Celtic legend.

Danu

(DAH-noo)

Mother of all Tuatha dé Danann, Earth mother in ancient Irish mythology and Celtic mythology.

Dermot

(Der- mO)

God of Love and Tuatha dé Danann prince, known for the rose-shaped mark on his forehead that causes women to fall in love with him in ancient Irish mythology and legend.

Donn

(Don)

Lord of the Lost Souls, God of the world of the Dead in ancient Irish mythology and legend.

Ecne

(Ek-Ne)

The God of Wisdom in ancient Irish mythology and legend.

Fionn

(FYUNN)

Tuatha dé Danann poet and an outlaw, in ancient Irish mythology and legend known for his army of followers and his ability to change into an animal or any type of human at will.

Flidais

(FLEE-daws or FLEE-dyesh)

Tuatha dé Danann princess and Goddess of sacred forests and wildlife in ancient Irish mythology and legend.

Fomorian

(Foh-MOOR-ian)

Pirate giants with supernatural powers in ancient Irish and Celtic mythology. They have red skin and breathe fire.

Lugh, the Shining One

(Lu)

Prince of the Tuatha dé Dannan, in ancient Irish mythology and legend, leader of the Warriors of Right, master of magic and all the arts. He is an accomplished carpenter, smith, warrior, harpist and poet. Lugh is said to be the son of Tuatha king and Fomorian giantess. He is the hero of Elven World Return of the Tuatha de Dannann.

Manopos

(Man-O-pohs)

Tuatha dé Danann prince, God of Youth in ancient Irish mythology.

Medb

(or Maeve (MAYV))

The warrior queen in ancient Irish mythology whose name means “intoxication” because of her beauty and passion for battle.

Mider

(MEE-cher)

A Tuatha dé Danann philosopher, in ancient Irish mythology, the God of Reason.

Nantosueltâ

(Nun-TAW-swel-taa)

Tuatha dé Danann Goddess of Nature in ancient Irish mythology. Her name can be translated as “sun-warmed valley”, or “she who makes the valley bloom.”

Nehalennia

(Neh-Hal-EN-ia)

Tuatha dé Danann Goddess of the sea and the protection of sea travelers in ancient Irish mythology. (Art by Clyde Caldwell)

Nematona

(Nem-ah-tone-ah)

Tuatha dé Danann Goddess of the sacred groves or shrines, in ancient Irish mythology.

Ogme, the Brave

(OG-ma)

Tuatha dé Dannan God of eloquence and language, scholars, education and writing in ancient Irish mythology. He is said to have invented the early Irish alphabet called Ogham.

Segomo

(Seg-oh-moe)

The Bold: A giant and warrior prince in Irish mythology.

Scota

(SKO-tah)

Tuatha dé Dannan, mistress of illusion and goddess of positive magic of ancient Irish mythology, who can slip beneath the surface of things and help to restore balance to negative situations. Scotland was named after her and she was the daughter of an Egyptian Pharaoh who sailed North to the emerald islands about 4,000 years ago.

Tara/Hill of Tara

Ancient site of Irish Kings and the Tuatha de Danann.

Today, the archeological site of Tara is under development endangering the sacred land.

Tír na nÓg: (pronounced Teer na Nok) Underground land of the magical people. The “Land of Youth.”